The post-WW2 versions of the British Battledress re-introduced some features of the Pattern 37 such as covered buttons on the main opening and pleated pockets. However, the pocket buttons were still exposed and the collar was meant to be worn open. There were some transitional models (Patterns 46 and 47) that incrementally adjusted features of the preceding Patterns 37 and 40 battledress to the final Pattern 49 shown on this page (source: http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/uniforms/49-pattern-bd-1944-fake-date-stamp-185791/#post600667, http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/uniforms/49-pattern-bd-1944-fake-date-stamp-185791/#post600888 ). These battledress items were meant to be worn for dress and parades instead of in combat, though some made it to Korea.

Warning: these are often “converted” by reenactors and unethical dealers to resemble wartime battledress items. Some officer’s uniforms legitimately tailored during the war do resemble the Pattern 49 cut so telling real from fake requires careful attention.

Sample 1: Pattern 49

Sample 2: Women’s Civil Defense

King’s Crown “CD” Buttons on epaulettes.  Cut smaller than sized.  Possibly meant to be worn open?